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Bloodborne Pathogens

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What are Blood-borne pathogens?

Blood-borne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries may expose workers to blood-borne pathogens. Workers in many occupations, including first aid team members, housekeeping personnel in some industries, nurses and other healthcare personnel may be at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens.

 

What can be done to control exposure to blood-borne pathogens?

In order to reduce or eliminate the hazards of occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens, an employer must implement an exposure control plan for the worksite with details on employee protection measures. The plan must also describe how an employer will use a combination of engineering and work practice controls, ensure the use of personal protective clothing and equipment, provide training , medical surveillance, hepatitis B vaccinations, and signs and labels, among other provisions. Engineering controls are the primary means of eliminating or minimizing employee exposure and include the use of safer medical devices, such as needle-less devices, shielded needle devices, and plastic capillary tubes.

 

What are blood-borne pathogens?

Blood-borne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries may expose workers to blood-borne pathogens. Workers in many occupations, including first aid team members, housekeeping personnel in some industries, nurses and other healthcare personnel may be at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens.

 

What can be done to control exposure to blood-borne pathogens?

In order to reduce or eliminate the hazards of occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens, an employer must implement an exposure control plan for the worksite with details on employee protection measures. The plan must also describe how an employer will use a combination of engineering and work practice controls, ensure the use of personal protective clothing and equipment, provide training , medical surveillance, hepatitis B vaccinations, and signs and labels, among other provisions. Engineering controls are the primary means of eliminating or minimizing employee exposure and include the use of safer medical devices, such as needle-less devices, shielded needle devices, and plastic capillary tubes.


Contact Information

City of Riviera Beach
Department of Human Resources - Room 248
1481 W 15th St.
Riviera Beach, FL 33404

Phone: (561) 840-4880
Fax: (561) 840-4881

Staff Portal


Hours of Operation:
Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

 

Staff

Human Resources Director
O'Ne Dupre

Email: odupre@rivierabeach.org

 

Assistant Human Resources Director
Eureka Young

Email: eyoung@rivierabeach.org

Risk Manager
Steve Shields

Email: sshields@rivierabeach.org

 

Senior Staff Assistant 
Carla Randle

Email:  crandle@rivierabeach.org


Human Resources Generalist 
Frank Zuniga

Email: fzuniga@rivierabeach.org

 

Benefits Administrator 
Stephen Gude 

Email: sgude@rivierabeach.org

 

Safety Officer 
Yvette McLeod

Email: ymcleod@rivierabeach.org